Sedgwick County Correctional Facility earns security project of the year

January 2, 2018


Total Retrofit Sedgwick County Correctional Facility earns security project of 2017 with Elliot A. Boxerbaum awardAs security projects go, correctional facilities present a unique set of circumstances for security system integrators and their fellow A&E partners and just as daunting a challenge to the end user. Not only are you subject to stringent timelines, tight budgets, along with state and federal oversight but the project team must keep the current systems up and running throughout the entire project.

So it was for Jarod Schechter, Captain and Support Division Commander for Sedgwick County’s Sheriff Department and his project team as they partnered with Mead & Hunt, a national firm offering design services in the fields of planning, design, architecture and engineering and integrators from Stanley Convergent Security Solutions, an extensive and broad-based retrofit of Segwick County Adult Detention Facility.

The project has been recognized by Security Technology Executive and SD&I magazines, along with SecurityInfoWatch.com and SecuritySpecifiers.com as the Elliot A. Boxerbaum Memorial Award winner for best security project of 2017.

Bringing Security into the 21st Century

At 468,000 square feet and 1,200 beds, the Sedgwick County ADF is the largest correctional facility in the state of Kansas. More than 25 years old, the original proprietary door control systems were failing and the obsolete security system was in serious need of an upgrade and required replacement.

This project involved a complete upgrade and replacement of existing Simplex jail security system while making effective reuse of the existing cable infrastructure. Another major job was the complete replacement of the existing video surveillance system requiring a total replacement of the antiquated analog video system to an advanced digital system technology that was needed to help reduce operational liabilities thorough the addition and updating of more than 500 surveillance cameras and the addition of a video storage system which the facility had done without for the past three decades.

READ MORE in Security Technology Executive (flip to page 18)